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October 18, 2019
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Railways not to produce new Vande Bharat rakes this fiscal

first_imgNew Delhi: The Indian Railways will not manufacture any new rake of the Vande Bharat Express in this financial year, Railway Board Chairman V.K. Yadav said on Monday. Yadav said, the ICF (Integral Coach Factory) plant in Chennai will not manufacture any new set of the Vande Bharat Express, which was earlier known as Train 18 in this financial year. He said the ICF will manufacture 40 sets of the Vande Bharat Express in 2020-21 and 2021-22. The decision was taken after looking at the recommendation for some modifications in the existing design, Yadav said. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalHe said that another set of the Vande Bharat Express between Delhi and Katra will start in the coming days. However, he refused to share the actual dates of the new services of the train. Prime Minister Narendra Modi flagged off the Vande Bharat Express chair-car train from New Delhi to his parliamentary constituency Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh on February 15 this year. It covers the 850-kilometre distance in eight hours, compared to the 12 hours by other trains. The gleaming blue-nosed train comes with the best amenities, including high-speed on-board WiFi, GPS-based passenger information system, touch-free bio-vacuum toilets, LED lighting, mobile charging points and a climate control system that automatically adjusts the temperature.last_img read more

October 17, 2019
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Sentencing arguments for Alberta man guilty of vicious sexual assault

first_imgLETHBRIDGE, Alta. – A man who beat a woman so viciously during a sexual assault that she had to learn how to walk and talk again is scheduled to face a sentencing hearing today.Denzel Dre Colton Bird, 21, was charged after the 25-year-old woman was struck from behind with a metal pipe, dragged into an alley and sexually attacked while she was walking to work in Lethbridge, Alta., in September 2016.The blows caused multiple skull fractures and fractured her facial bones as well.A passerby discovered the woman, partially naked and stuffed into a garbage can, and she was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries. The victim was in a medically induced coma for weeks in a Calgary hospital. She was released a year ago and her family says she continues to recover, although she has no memory of the attack.Police have said there was no apparent connection between Bird and his victim.Bird pleaded guilty last September to aggravated sexual assault and break and enter.His sentencing was delayed because of a long wait for a forensic psychiatric assessment and a Gladue report, which considers an accused’s Indigenous background.The maximum sentence for aggravated sexual assault is life in prison.Bird’s lawyer, Tonii Roulston, has said she will be asking Judge Jerry LeGrandeur for a sentence in the six- to eight-year range.When her client entered guilty pleas last year, she said he just wanted the case to be over.“Just like the family of the victim, it’s been hanging over his head as well, and he is anxious to take responsibility for his actions,” Roulston said.The case has been marked by delays. Bird fired his original lawyer, then rehired him before firing him again and retaining Roulston.— Follow @BillGraveland on Twitterlast_img read more

October 17, 2019
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Domestic violence survivor speaks out following gruesome assault

first_imgWARNING: Some details in this story are disturbing.CALGARY – “I’m lucky to be here.” Dawn Warden’s life was forever changed on June 9 when she says an ex-boyfriend attacked her in her Airdrie home with a sword, slicing off her fingers and one ear.The violence was horrific.“All my fingers were pretty much cut off, except for my thumb. I lost three, they saved seven. My shoulder was cut from the back to the end,  twice, I think, in a ‘v’ shape. There are two marks there. It was cut to the bone,” she described.“My ear was cut off to the back of my neck… I had three gashes on my stomach and one on my right thigh.”After the initial attack, Warden says the man set her room on fire. She was rushed to hospital where she spent eight hours in emergency surgery so doctors could reattach some of her fingers and her ear. Doctors used stitches in her hands and ears and 150 staples to close up her horrific wounds.Dawn Warden’s life was forever changed on June 9 when she says an ex-boyfriend attacked her in her Airdrie home with a sword, slicing off her fingers and one ear. (PHOTO: Megan McPhaden 660 NEWS.)“Where my hands are concerned, they say I should be able to get use of them. I might not be able to make a fist,” said Warden, a hairdresser and a painter.“They said I more than likely won’t be able to do hair again, but I’m stubborn. I’m still positive on that. But they did a fantastic job of saving the most important fingers.”As she recovers in her hospital room, she is speaking out–she wants more to be done to prevent other women from ending up in her situation.“I was in a slump. My son passed away a year ago and I kind of lost who I was, my sense of who I was.” Warden teared up as she credited her other son for pulling her out of her depression. She says while most people assume victims stay out of fear, every story is different.“I think I held on to the relationship because it was another relationship I could lose,” she said. “I personally stayed because when you have a loss of a child you lose a lot of your support…You don’t get over it easily.”While domestic violence victims are rarely named by police due to privacy restrictions, Warden is speaking out in the hopes of educating others and preventing future attacks from happening.“That’s really, really important for me.”But for now, she is focussing on recover and regaining some independence.Domestic violence accounts for half of homicides in Calgary Domestic violence is all too common in Alberta. In Calgary alone, police say six of the 12 murder cases this year have been domestic-related.The majority of them have been women and children killed by partners or family members.READ MORE:Over half of Calgary homicides this year domestic related: CPSVictims of domestic abuse face danger when trying to leave: expertsGuilty verdict in Edward Downey double murder trialFather deliberately set fire that killed both his daughter and himself: policeMurder charges laid in deaths of Calgary mother and daughterAccording to a domestic violence organization that works closely with police, Sagesse Domestic Violence Prevention Society, CPS is on track to receive 30,000 domestic-violence-related calls this year.“We know that when natural disasters or economic dips happen, [certain] communities are more impacted by domestic violence. We also now that Indigenous people have higher rates of experiencing domestic violence,” explained Executive Director of Sagesse Domestic Violence Prevention Society, Andrea Silverstone.“Airdrie has higher rates of domestic violence. There was a study done in Airdrie, I think it was three or four years ago, that said Airdrie has four times higher than the rest of the province of Alberta.”Silverstone says ending the cycle is something everyone needs to play an active role in.“Most people who are experiencing domestic violence, or are using violence, the first person that they tell is a confidant–a friend of a family member. And the thing that we actually need to do is build capacity among Albertans–because most of us are confidants for somebody–about how to recognize domestic violence, respond appropriately, and then help our friend or family member get the supports that they need.”If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse–or using violence–call 1-403-234-7233(SAFE) or click here.last_img read more

October 14, 2019
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Young Wetsuweten artist making a name for herself

first_imgLee WilsonAPTN NewsStephanie Anderson, a Wet’suwet’en artist, is creating a name for herself in northwestern British Columbia.Anderson, 28, grew up in Terrace, B.C., but everything changed after she walked through the doors of the art school she enrolled in.She spent hours honing her craft and the training, and tools she received helped her to carve “Wolf and Moon” which placed second in Indigenous Arts and Stories this summer.The competition had 950 submissions, the largest amount in the program’s 15 year history.(The Wolf and Moon by Stephanie Anderson)Anderson graduated the third-year program at Freda Diesing Art School at Coast Mountain College.“It kind of lifted me up you know. I was like ‘wow’ because it’s Canada wide. They pool it from artists all over Canada. I just felt beside myself that I was selected.“I was also just really grateful being runner up,“ said Anderson.Freda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art, named after the Haida artist, continues her legacy of carrying First Nations culture and arts.The school is remarkable, a First Nations art and program where students receive university credits which are recognized by Emily Carr University.(Ken McNeil is a founding member of the school, a master carver and one of Anderson’s mentors. Photo: Lee Wilson/APTN)“The Freda Diesing School is the first of its kind in Canada… she taught a lot of well-respected carvers in B.C.,” said Ken McNeil.McNeil has mentored Anderson from the start in college and now is working with her on a piece that will go on display at Vancouver International Airport.Part of their program that recognized emerging artists. For Ken seeing students and graduates have success makes him proud.“It leaves a good feeling in me to see the students that progress into the art market because it is a hard place to be and a hard place to stay,” he said.Anderson said there are challenges of being a northwest artist in Canada.She has been working 12 months straight on her art for the local area.She has developed pieces for the Terrace post office, carving for Skeena Salmon Fest and a mural for the Terrace Airport.“Any entrepreneur in any field, you’re self-reliant, you are the boss, you are working all the time to make deadlines and make opportunities to meet people,” she said.“It’s more than a full-time job”lwilson@aptn.calast_img read more

October 12, 2019
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UN atomic watchdog chief wraps up visit to Iran

During the two-day visit, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei met with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, among other senior officials, and held discussions on how to speed up the implementation of safeguards and on confidence-building measures, the agency said in a press release.The progress made in implementing a work plan decided upon between the IAEA and Tehran last August was noted during the talks. An agreement was also reached on a time line for implementing the remaining verification issues specified in the August work plan, under which implementation of this plan would be completed in the next four weeks.While in the country, Iran gave the IAEA information on the country’s research development activities on a new generation of centrifuges.Mr. ElBaradei – accompanied on his trip by Ollie Heinonen, Deputy Director General for Safeguards and Vilmos Cserveny, Director for External Relations and Policy Coordination – also discussed the importance of putting the Additional Protocol and other confidence-building measures called for by the Security Council into place.The country’s nuclear programme – which Iranian authorities have stated is for peaceful purposes, but other countries contend is driven by military ambitions – has been a matter of international concern since the discovery in 2003 that Iran had concealed its nuclear activities for 18 years in breach of its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).In December 2006, the Security Council adopted a resolution banning trade with Iran in all items, materials, equipment, goods and technology which could contribute to the country’s enrichment-related, reprocessing or heavy water-related activities, or to the development of nuclear-weapon-delivery systems. It tightened the measures in March, banning arms sales and expanding the freeze on assets.However, a United States intelligence report released late last year concluded that there has been no ongoing nuclear weapons programme in Iran since the fall of 2003, which Mr. ElBaradei said tallies with the findings of the IAEA. 14 January 2008A visit by the head of the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to Iran to resolve outstanding issues over the country’s nuclear programme has concluded, with the agency and Tehran agreeing on the next steps. read more

October 12, 2019
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Nepal must end culture of impunity says UN human rights chief

In particular, Louise Arbour drew attention to the failure to prosecute the killers of Maina Sunuwar, a 15-year-old Nepalese girl who was allegedly tortured and then died while in the custody of the Nepalese Army in 2004.“Lack of accountability in this and numerous other cases is helping to perpetuate a culture of impunity in Nepal,” Ms. Arbour said. “And there is a danger this could become a barrier to achieving lasting peace.”Maina’s case has come to symbolize the fate of hundreds of other Nepalese who disappeared during the decade-long armed conflict between the Government and the Maoists that formally ended with the signing of a 2006 peace accord.Ms. Arbour noted that Maina’s case “presents a significant opportunity for the Government of Nepal to send a signal that the culture of impunity is ending,” adding that “the successful prosecution of those responsible for her murder will strengthen the rule of law and uphold victims’ rights to a remedy.”Following an investigation, the Nepal’s Supreme Court issued summons in January for four people accused in the case. While noting this recent development, the High Commissioner emphasized the need for more to be done if justice is to be served in the case. In particular, she cited the need for the Nepalese Army to cooperate fully with the ongoing investigation.Ms. Arbour said her office, along with other national and international human rights bodies, will continue to urge the Government to provide victims and their families with truth, justice and redress in line with international standards. 17 February 2008The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has called on Nepal to address the culture of impunity that exists in the country, warning that not doing so will threaten the achievement of lasting peace. read more

October 7, 2019
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SaskPowers Net Metering rebate program a victim of its own success

SaskPower warning customers about text message scam Increased outages, steady rates featured in SaskPower annual report When it was announced, the program was to run until reaching a cap was of 16 megawatts or until Nov. 30, 2021. SaskPower now expects to reach that capacity in the “very near future,” some two years ahead of initial expectations.Story continues belowThis advertisement has not loaded yet,but your article continues below.Once the cap is reached, SaskPower won’t accept any new applications until a program review is completed.Because of the way the program is set up — with approvals before equipment installation — SaskPower spokesman Joel Cherry said it’s unlikely people would be caught with solar panels they couldn’t use. And going forward, there will be a minimal number of application approvals.In addition to SaskPower’s rebate program, small and medium-sized businesses are also taking advantage of federal funds that apply to solar projects. SaskPower says the average size of applications into the Net Metering program has increased by 80 per cent since July 2019, when the federal funding was announced.If the program was to continue as it is currently, the financial impact would be an estimated $54-million per year by 2025, according to SaskPower.Earlier this month, SaskPower had run into a vendor supply issue for bi-directional meters, which allow SaskPower to track power coming to Net Metering customers from the grid, and solar power going out to the grid. A SaskPower spokesman said Wednesday that the shipment has since arrived. Due to what’s been described as “unprecedented customer demand,” SaskPower will stop taking applications earlier than planned for a program that provides rebates for solar installations.“We have seen a dramatic increase in uptake in the (Net Metering) Program in recent weeks, driven in part by federal funding that applies to large Net Metering projects,” Mike Marsh, SaskPower president and CEO, said in announcing the change on Wednesday.“Going forward we will be reviewing the program to ensure it remains financially sustainable and continues to meet the needs of our customers and our company,” he said in a release.First approved in November 2018, the program offers rebates for solar installations and premium credits for surplus power. Net Metering allows customers to generate up to 100 kilowatts of power, typically solar, to decrease their monthly power bills and get credit for the excess power they generate.Related read more

October 6, 2019
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UN panel on possible cloning ban wraps up first session on troubling

“We went as far as we could in this Ad Hoc Committee at this time,” said Peter Tomka of Slovakia, the Chairman of the new UN Ad Hoc Committee on an International Convention against the Reproductive Cloning of Human Beings, at the end of the talks. He noted that the session, which heard briefings from experts in genetics and bioethics, had been educational for many participants. Attention had been focused on a number of issues involving important and fundamental policy, ethical and technical questions, he noted, but no particular conclusion had been reached. The Committee’s final report, adopted following extensive discussions on the precise language to be used in describing the five-day proceedings, notes that there was general agreement that the reproductive cloning of human beings should be prohibited. The report also points out that some delegations sought an approach that would lead to a negotiating mandate on a universal ban on cloning humans, while others favoured a more comprehensive approach, and a mandate to also negotiate to ban cloning for therapeutic, experimental and research purposes. In setting up the committee by adopting a resolution last December, the General Assembly said life sciences are opening prospects for health improvements, but termed current research on human cloning “an attack on the human dignity of the individual.” The initiative for an international ban on human reproductive cloning was first proposed by France and Germany last August. They asserted that while only a small number of researchers or scientific institutions had the technical capacity to perform such operations, there was no doubt that the practice would have an impact on the entire human family. In response, they called for the treaty’s elaboration under UN auspices. read more

October 3, 2019
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Arctic farming Town defies icy conditions with hydroponics

by Rachel D’Oro, The Associated Press Posted Nov 4, 2016 2:23 am MDT Last Updated Nov 4, 2016 at 11:43 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email ANCHORAGE, Alaska – The landscape is virtually treeless around a coastal hub town above Alaska’s Arctic Circle, where even summer temperatures are too cold for boreal roots to take hold.Amid these unforgiving conditions, a creative kind of farming is sprouting up in the largely Inupiat community of Kotzebue.A subsidiary of a local Native corporation is using hydroponics technology to grow produce inside an insulated, 40-foot shipping container equipped with glowing magenta LED lights. Arctic Greens is harvesting kale, various lettuces, basil and other greens weekly from the soil-free system and selling them at the supermarket in the community of nearly 3,300.“We’re learning,” Will Anderson, president of the Native Kikiktagruk Inupiat Corp., said of the business launched last spring. “We’re not a farming culture.”The venture is first of its kind north of the Arctic Circle, according to the manufacturer of Kotzebue’s pesticide-free system. The goal is to set up similar systems in partnerships with other rural communities far from Alaska’s minimal road system — where steeply priced vegetables can be more than a week in transit and past their prime by the time they arrive at local stores.There are other tools for extending the short growing season in a state with cold soil. One increasingly popular method involves high tunnels, tall hoop-shaped structures that cover crops.But the season can last year-round with indoor hydroponics, which uses water and nutrients to grow vertically stacked plants rooted in a binding material such as rock wool.Anchorage-based Vertical Harvest Hydroponics, which builds enclosed systems out of transformed shipping containers, partnered with Kikiktagruk. The 2-year-old company also sold the system to a farmer in the rural town of Dillingham.“Our vision is that this can be a long-term solution to the food shortage problems in the north,” said Ron Perpich, a company founder. “We’re hoping that we can put systems anywhere that there’s people.”But the operations have challenges, including steep price tags. Startup costs in Kotzebue were around $200,000, including the customized freight container and the price to fly it in a C-130 transport plane from Anchorage, 550 miles to the southeast.The town also relies heavily on expensive diesel power, so operations could eat into profits.In addition, moving tender produce from its moist, warm growing enclosure to a frigid environment can be challenging. And farming can be a largely foreign concept to Native communities with deeply imbedded traditions of hunting and gathering.Still, the potential benefits outweigh the downsides, according to Johanna Herron, state market access and food safety manager.Grown with the correct nutrient balance, hydroponics produce is considered just as safe as crops grown using other methods.“It’s not the only solution,” Herron said. “Hydroponics is just a piece of it, but certainly an excellent thing for communities to look into.”Alaska Commercial Co., which has stores in nearly three dozen remote communities, is carrying Arctic Greens in the Kotzebue store. This week, the Dillingham AC store is beginning to sell produce grown in the local farm’s hydroponics system. The chain will bring the Arctic Greens brand to more locations if expansion plans prove cost-effective, AC general manager Walter Pickett told The Associated Press.“The produce is fantastic, at least what we’ve been seeing out of Kotzebue,” he said. “The customers love it.”Lisa Adan is among the Kotzebue residents who regularly buy the produce. She said there are plans to start providing it at the local hospital’s cafeteria, where she is an assistant manager.Adan said the locally grown greens are superior to the produce that’s transported north.“It’s so much better,” she said. “It tastes like it just came out of your garden.”For now, the new business is operating as a prototype, especially as it enters the long, harsh winter season in Kotzebue, 26 miles north of the Arctic Circle.The town, the regional hub for northwest Alaska villages, is built on a 3-mile-long spit, and many there live a subsistence lifestyle. The community has a chronically high unemployment rate, with the school district, state and local hospital among its major employers.For now, the biggest selling point of the hydroponics produce is freshness. Prices are parallel with greens brought up from the Lower 48.But operators are trying to work out kinks and find ways to lower energy costs, possibly through such alternatives as wind power, according to Anderson.“We want to be a benefit to the community,” he said. “Not only do we want fresher produce, but affordable produce.”Nearly 400 miles to the northeast, the village corporation in the Inupiat community of Nuiqsut is considering acquiring one of the systems. Joe Nukapigak, president of the Kuukpik Corp., said he plans to travel to Kotzebue after Thanksgiving to see hydroponics in action.Unlike diesel-powered Kotzebue, Nuiqsut is just miles from the Prudhoe Bay oil field and taps into far less costly natural gas.Nukapigak envisions the oil industry as a possible customer if hydroponics takes hold in his village. He also likes the thought of same-day freshness as opposed to produce that’s sometimes ruined by the time it arrives.“If we have a local operation like that, it would not get spoiled as much,” he said. “It would be made locally, and that would help.”___Follow Rachel D’Oro at https://twitter.com/rdoro In this Oct. 18, 2016 photo taken in Anchorage, Alaska, Dan Perpich talks about his company, Vertical Harvest Hydroponics, which partnered with an Alaska Native corporation to grow produce inside an insulated shipping container in the northwest Alaska town of Kotzebue. The goal is to grow kale, lettuces and other greens year-round, despite the region’s unforgiving climate. (AP Photo/Rachel D’Oro) Arctic farming: Town defies icy conditions with hydroponics read more

September 25, 2019
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SNP threaten formal dispute over DUP deal as they claim Scottish Secretarys

first_imgHe said that if the row was not resolved through talks with HM Treasury, the Scottish Government would invoke a formal dispute resolution which would see ministers from both governments tackle the issue through the Join Ministerial Committee.The JMC was formed through a memorandum of understanding to deal with the relationships between the UK Government and the devolved administrations.Mr Mackay said ministers “fundamentally disagreed” with the way the additional money had been allocated and claimed all the areas  to which the funding package had been allocated – infrastructure development, health, education, broadband, deprivation – were devolved matters to which the Barnett formula should apply.  He wrote: “The UK Government’s argument that there should be no Barnett consequentials for Scotland and Wales (or indeed funding for England) from the financial elements of the agreement is unacceptable and inconsistent with the terms of the Statement of Funding Policy. “Only a year ago the SNP were arguing that we should give up the Barnett formula and that we should have full fiscal autonomy which would’ve cost Scotland billions.”He also welcomed the Scottish Government’s call for a formal review of the process, saying he was confident it would show the government had complied fully with the rules.The UK Government argues that the Barnett mechanism, which sets Treasury funding for the devolved administrations, did not mean extra funding should be allocated to Scotland, as its calculations were based solely on extra spending in England. “Paragraph 2.15 of the Statement of Funding Policy, is very clear that the “assessment of whether a programme is unique at a UK level (and thus outside the Barnett arrangements) should be exceptional and that any such assessment should be evidence-based, be undertaken in a timely manner, and be considered by Treasury ministers and their counterparts in the devolved administrations to ensure all viewpoints are understood before final decisions are taken.” Ian Blackford claimed Mr Mundell had been ‘utterly humiliated’Credit:Stuart Nicol Nicola Sturgeon has threatened a formal dispute with the UK Government over the £1 billion Tory deal with the DUP, as the SNP claimed David Mundell’s position as Scottish Secretary was “fast becoming untenable”.The First Minister said Mr Mundell had proved he was not “able or willing to fight Scotland’s corner in Cabinet” after it emerged the deal to prop up Theresa May’s minority Government would mean new funding for Northern Ireland, but nothing for Holyrood.Her spokesman claimed this was incompatible with the Scottish Secretary’s statement at the weekend that he would oppose “anything that could be construed as backdoor funding to Northern Ireland”.Derek Mackay, Scotland’s Finance Minister, has written to the Treasury demanding talks and warning that if there was no progress he would formally initiate a mechanism that seeks to resolve disputes between UK and Scottish ministers through the Joint Ministerial Committee.Mr Mundell insisted that the deal with the DUP was transparent and did not infringe the rules of the Barnett formula.He said he had been clear that any arrangement had to be subject to its rules, adding: “I always argue for resources and funds for Scotland and the most important argument that I’ve made consistently over the years is that the Barnett formula should continue, and that’s the difference between myself and the SNP. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. ian blackford In the Commons, the Speaker said he had listened carefully to representations from Pete Wishart, the SNP MP, but was not persuaded the matter should be discussed under the procedure. But Ian Blackford, the SNP’s Westminster leader, attempted to ramp up the pressure on Mr Mundell by claiming that he had been “utterly humiliated” by the deal and he cannot continue in his post unless he answers a series of key questions.These include when the Scottish Secretary learnt there would be no spending “consequentials” for Scotland under the Barnett formula and whether he had been lobbying behind the scenes for extra money to be allocated north of the Border. Derek Mackay has written to Liz TrussCredit:Corbis News He added that there had been no consultation with ministers north of the border and said the Scottish Government did not accept the UK Government’s view that there were precedents for the funding going to the province, through initiatives such as “city deals”, which have seen hundreds of millions of pounds go to Scotland without any Barnett consequentials elsewhere. Meanwhile, as John Bercow rejected an SNP request for an emergency debate on the DUP deal,  Mr Mackay accused the Tories of “ripping off Scotland to the tune of £2.9 billion” and undermining devolution and called for an urgent meeting with Elizabeth Truss, Chief Secretary to the Treasury. derek mackaylast_img read more

September 25, 2019
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Visiting open gardens is as harmful for your horticultural confidence as comparing

Monty Don visits gardens around the world Monty Don has extolled the virtues of gardening to help with mental health throughout his career, after revealing he suffered from depression.Open gardens fan Claire Laurie, 60, agreed. She said: “I love going to open gardens because you get to meet such nice people, you see some really good ideas.”But you do think, ‘blimey’. I saw a garden that was just 100ft long and 10ft wide and she had done such amazing things with mirrors and it was so artistic. I wished I had that skill. I came home with a bit of garden envy.”You do definitely feel ‘I wish I was a better gardener.'”I do think ‘thank goodness I don’t have to open my own garden and work day and night on it’, and people who attend can be quite judgmental, they say ‘I don’t like that colour’ or ‘there’s a weed over there.”George Plumptre, chief executive of the National Garden Scheme hit out at Monty Don’s comments, saying: “Monty Don is very much mistaken when it comes to garden visiting and his puzzling claims make me question if he has even been to a National Garden Scheme opening.“The National Garden Scheme is about gardening enthusiasts sharing their passion and hard work for the public to enjoy, while raising vital funds for charities that do amazing work.”The presenter replied:  “My express brief in my Gardeners’ World Magazine column is to provoke fresh thought about familiar aspects of gardens and gardening and I am sorry that George Plumptre, who I greatly respect, is unable or unwilling to spot the irony or deliberate provocation in this particular piece.” Visiting open gardens is as harmful for your horticultural confidence as comparing your life to a celebrity, Monty Don has suggested.Seeing perfectly pruned lawns in a garden owned by a member of the public can cause anxiety, the presenter said in Gardener’s World magazine.He added: “Visiting gardens is bad for you. Not only does it encourage too much eating of cake but sets up all kinds of false notions that are ruinous to your garden back home.”There is a real problem associated with [open gardens], which is that dipping into a garden once, or perhaps two or three times, in a lifetime is as close to gardening reality as seeing a celebrity’s photograph and thinking that you really know them. What you see is a very contrived snapshot of something endlessly changeable that is frozen for a brief moment.”Admiration has knock-on effects; it can stultify our own gardens and awareness of gardens in general.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Monty Don visits gardens around the worldCredit:Alexandra Henderson read more

September 24, 2019
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Famous Symons name combines with Smico to form new screening group identity

first_imgThe new company name SmicoSymons Vibratory Screens was recently announced. Formed from two leading industry brands, Smico Manufacturing and Symons Screens, SmicoSymons brings a combined 170 years of experience to the screening industry. Symons began making screens in 1933 in California, and the same brothers, Ory and Ed Symons designed and manufactured the still well known Symons cone crusher which was later bought by Nordberg in Milwaukee which went on to be acquired by Metso.The Smico product line will continue to focus on the industrial, food and minerals industries while the Symons product line will continue to focus on the aggregate and mining industries. Still manufactured in the US in Oklahoma, these two brands continue to pioneer and deliver both standard and customised screening solutions for a wide range of common and speciality applications worldwide, including mining. The group states: “Unlike many other manufacturers, SmicoSymons continues to modify existing screening models and engineer custom screening solutions for its broad customer base. Unique production conditions and process variables make selection of the proper screening equipment a critical factor for operational success. SmicoSymons’ qualified materials test lab ensures that the machine type, size, setting and screen media selected will achieve the precise sizing and tonnage per hour required for each specific application.”Smico’s broad product line includes a wide range of standard and customisable vibrating screeners, conveyors, separators, feeders, shakers, sifters and other process equipment. These range from specialty low-volume, fine screens to major-tonnage aggregate and mining screens. A few of Smico’s most popular products include the DH2 Vibratory Screener heavy-duty, high-frequency screen; and the Vibroset Vibrating Screener light-duty high-frequency screen.last_img read more

September 22, 2019
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Croatia the last semifinalist after a match for all or nothing

The last match in the NRGi Arena saw a magnificent handball performance in Aarhus, as Croatia sealed the last remaining semifinal berth in a spectacular match against Poland. Poland took the first half with 15:14 to their favor, after a real brawl on the pitch, which saw both teams, fight for every single goal.The half-time break proved key for Croatian team in this match, as Goluža and his men came back a different team for the second half. The Croat left everyone guessing what is that he said to his team at the break, as they scored three goals in first two minutes of the half unanswered, as they completely undone all the work Poland had put in the past 30 minutes. Tenacious Poland never let Croatia go too far ahead, but were unable to mount the comeback as the last moments of the game saw only a consolation goal from their hero, Lijewski after Horvat sealed the faith of Polish team, a minute earlier. Duvnjak was hero of the day for Croatia, as he scored the goal worthy a semi-final berth for Croatia earlier in the match, as the final score stood at 28:31 in the end.STATISTICSThe audience atthe NRGi Arena already saw everything they could hope for in a handball match, mid-way through the first half as the suspensions were given and penalties saved on both ends, in an amazing tempo. The score was level at 10 all 25 minutes into the game (10:10), before Poland took a 2-goal lead with a penalty from Kuchczynski. Poland took a 3-goal lead at 14:11 the score with five minutes until the half time whistle from the fast break, as annoyed Goluža calls for a time-out. Croatia took one back thanks to a save from excellent Alilović, which allowed Horvat score the fast-break for 14:13 and three minutes to go. Last minute of the half saw Bičanić with a rocket and only a goal to catch, as Alilović keeps yet another effort from Poland. Duvnjak failed to find the net in his last effort of the half but it was BartoszJurecki that was substituted for injury, but only a minor one, as he should be fine for the second half. Poland goes for a break a happier team, as they kept a narrow lead mainly due to safe hands from Szmal as the ever-dependable keeper has had a performance of his own, upon Jaszka’s 3 goals to set Poland one goal apart at half time, with 15:14 on the scoreboard. Whatever SlavkoGoluža said to his players in the dressing room worked out, as the second half saw an amazing turnaround from Croatia. ‘The Cowboys’ scored three goals in first two minutes of the half to take the two-goal lead at 15:17.Goluža’s decision to bring in the substitute keeper for penalties was a good one as the experienced VenioLosert made his second penalty save of the game to keep his team with a three-goal cushion, five minutes into the second half.  Goal from Kopljarless than two minutes later put Croatia firmly back into the driving seat, as the towering right-back from PSG sets the score at 15:19.Croatia went on to make a 5-goal mid-way through the second half but a suspension for Kopljar, followed by a turnover from Duvnjak that allowed Kuchczynski to score for 21:24 forced Goluža to react fast and call for time-out.Croatia was leading 24:28 with less than five minutes until the last whistle, as the coach Michael Biegler calls for time-out in a last attempt to get back into the game. Poland was fighting like a fish on the chopping board as the last three minutes saw them get one goal back with a lovely right-back effort from Jurecki. threeminutes until the end saw Goluža call for a time-out break for his team, in a real pressure cooker in Aarhus, as the Croatian tactician instructed his team how to employ Kopljar, who scored from an excellent team effort right after the time-out. Celebration has already started on Croatian bench, after their 4-2 defense kept Poland at bay. Horvat’s breakthrough goal in the last minute of the matchwas the icing on a cake,before the consolation goal from Lijewski, with the score 28:31, as Croatia is through to the semi-finals. No one can begrudge Croatia this victory,as the better team won todayafter a big effort put by Poland. The rave team of Poland will not leave the championship empty-handed as, they will now face Iceland in a match for the 5th place; deservedly so, as both teams fought hard to reach the final stages of the championship. With the last semi-final participant known we say goodbye to NGRi Arena and the city of Aarhus in anticipation of the semi-final matches, which will be:Spain against France and Denmark vs. Croatiaon January 24, expecting a full house at the Jyske Bank Boxen Arena in Herning.TEXT: NEMANJA SAVICPHOTO: Bjørn Kenneth Muggerud/Handballpix.com ← Previous Story EURO 2014 semi-finals: Spain on France, Denmark against Croatia! Next Story → WISLA PLOCK’S TARGET: Angel Montoro to join Cadenas’s squad? euro 2014 handballhandball read more

September 20, 2019
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Les longs voyages dans lespace endommageraient le cerveau

first_imgLes longs voyages dans l’espace endommageraient le cerveauSelon une étude menée sur souris de laboratoire, les longs voyages spatiaux exposeraient les astronautes à des radiations capables de perturber le fonctionnement du cerveau et d’accélérer le développement de la maladie d’Alzheimer.Depuis des décennies que l’exploration spatiale se poursuit, les équipes s’appliquent à évaluer et surveiller les effets qu’ont les voyages spatiaux sur l’organisme humain. A chaque expédition, les spationautes subissent ainsi des batteries de tests destinés à fournir des données en ce sens. Ceci a notamment permis de montrer “les risques pour la santé d’une exposition aux radiations dans l’espace, tels que des cancers”. Des risques connus “depuis longtemps”. Mais une étude publiée lundi dans la revue scientifique PLoS ONE va plus loin. Menés par le Dr Kerry O’Banion, professeur de neurobiologie au centre médical de l’université de Rochester (New York), ces travaux font état de nouvelles découvertes et pas des moindres. “Cette dernière étude montre pour la première fois qu’être exposé à des niveaux de radiations équivalents à une mission vers Mars produirait des effets cognitifs néfastes et accéléreraient des changements dans le cerveau liés à la maladie d’Alzheimer”, indique-t-il cité par le Monde.fr. En effet, le champ magnétique terrestre nous protège des particules radioactives venant de l’espace. Mais pour des séjours prolongés dans l’espace profond, il n’existe que peu de moyens de se protéger. Ce danger préoccupe particulièrement la NASA, qui envisage d’envoyer des astronautes vers un astéroïde en 2021 et prévoit une mission habitée sur Mars vers 2035. Le voyage aller-retour vers la planète rouge pourrait prendre jusqu’à trois ans. Aussi, les auteurs de la nouvelle étude ont travaillé sur ce projet de la NASA et mené des recherches sur huit ans. L’objectif était de déterminer les dangers potentiels pour la santé des voyages spatiaux et si oui de savoir si de tels périples justifiaient les risques encourus par les astronautes.Des radiations qui causeraient à long terme des atteintes neurologiques À lire aussiChien : l’Homme aurait impacté la structure du cerveau du chienPlus en détail, les recherches ont surtout étudié l’impact d’une forme de radiation de particules de grande masse et de haute énergie propulsées à très grande vitesse dans l’espace par la puissance des explosions stellaires. “Ces particules peuvent pénétrer dans les parois protectrices des engins spatiaux, ce qui pose un problème difficile d’ingénierie pour protéger efficacement les astronautes”, explique le Dr O’Banion. Ces éléments ont pu être mis en évidence grâce à un accélérateur de particules qui a permis de reproduire ces radiations cosmiques auxquels ont ensuite été exposées des souris.Celles soumises à des niveaux comparables à ceux qui affecteraient des astronautes durant une mission sur Mars ont par la suite échoué aux tests de mémoire. D’après l’étude, elles auraient souffert de dégénérescence neurologique, d’altération vasculaire et d’une accumulation plus importante que la normale de bêta amyloïde, une protéine qui forme des plaques étouffant les neurones, caractéristiques de la maladie d’Alzheimer.Pour préparer un éventuel voyage vers Mars, la NASA a mené une expérimentation baptisée Mars 500 qui a pris fin l’année dernière. Celle-ci visait à évaluer les difficultés que pouvaient rencontrer un équipage en route vers Mars ainsi que les conséquences sur leur santé d’un tel périple. Pour autant, elle ne s’était pas intéressée à l’impact des radiations cosmiques. Cette découverte suggère ainsi que bon nombre de travaux restent à faire avant d’envoyer en toute sécurité des astronautes vers la planète rouge ou toute autre corps éloigné. Le 2 janvier 2013 à 15:14 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

September 19, 2019
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Police Arrest Dutch YouTubers for Trespassing Area 51 Site

first_imgStay on target Two Dutch YouTube stars were recently arrested for trespassing at Area 51, a top-secret military base in Nevada, on Wednesday.According to the Nye County Sheriff’s Office, Ties Granzier, 20, and Govert Charles Wilhelmus Jacob Sweep, 21, who are both from the Netherlands, were booked at Nye County Detention Center for illegally driving into Area 51. The pair reportedly traveled three miles into Area 51 and disregarded the “No Trespassing” signs posted by the United States Department of Energy, Newsweek noted. Both men tried to go to the classified military facility at Groom Lake, which is known as Area 51. Granzier’s Instagram showed pictures of the pair’s trip in Nevada before they arrived at Area 51. Granzier and Sweep both have over 200,000 followers on their YouTube channels: Granzier, who has roughly 308,000 subscribers, is known for his videos of abandoned sites, while Sweep, who is followed by approximately 700,000 subscribers, is more focused on DIY projects.Earlier this summer, a mock Facebook event called “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us,” generated more than one million “interested” or “going” responses from alien-obsessed fans. Even though the September 20 event was a hoax, the U.S. military and authorities have warned people to not visit the confidential area.“It sounded like there were definitely some ties to that,” Captain David Boruchowitz of the Nye County Sheriff’s Office told Newsweek, referring to the pair’s potential motives for going to Area 51. “Stay away from the test site, please, for everybody’s sake.”On Thursday, Granzier and Sweep were released on a $500 bail. Their next scheduled court date is September 16 at the Beatty Justice Court in Beatty, Nevada.More on Geek.com:‘Storm Area 51’ Creator Parts Ways With Alien-Themed Festival in NevadaNearly 300K Alien Fans Sign Up to ‘Raid Area 51’ for Joke Facebook EventLil Nas X Rescues Aliens in Animated ‘Old Town Road’ Area 51 Videocenter_img ‘Storm Area 51′ Creator Parts Ways With Alien-Themed Festival in Nevada’Storm Bermuda Triangle’ Event Is Here to Rival Internet’s ‘Area 51 Raid’ Authorities found Granzier and Sweep parked near a gate with a drone, camera equipment, and a laptop. Both men told officials that even though they were aware of the “No Trespassing” signs, they still wanted to venture to the site. The Nye County Sheriff’s Office, which works with the military to handle arrests at the Area 51 site, said Granzier and Sweep agreed to let police search their phones. The duo reportedly took footage at the Area 51 site, which is not accessible to the public.last_img read more

September 17, 2019
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President Trump to visit San Diego next week

first_img Posted: March 7, 2018 March 7, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed today that President Donald Trump will visit California next week, a journey that is expected to include a San Diego-area stop so he can view border wall prototypes.Sanders did not give details of the trip, confirming only that Trump “will be headed to California next week.”The Washington Post reported last week that Trump plans to visit the San Diego area to view the eight, 30-foot-tall border wall prototypes that have erected in Otay Mesa. The trip will also include a Republican National Committee fundraiser in Los Angeles, The Post reported.The trip will be Trump’s first to California since taking office. Asked why it has taken Trump so long to visit the state, Sanders said, “I think it’s because he’s been busy growing the economy, creating jobs, defeating ISIS, remaking the judiciary.”Confirmation of the trip came on the heels of a lawsuit filed against California by the U.S. Department of Justice challenging a trio of state laws that offer protections to people living in the country illegally. Trump has been openly critical of the state’s political leaders and policies.“They’re doing a lousy management job, they have the highest taxes in the nation and they don’t know what’s happening out there. Frankly it’s a disgrace, the sanctuary city situation, the protection of these horrible criminals,” Trump said last month.The wall prototypes represent the signature promise of Trump’s campaign: To build a “big, beautiful wall” along the U.S.-Mexico border.He has so far been unsuccessful in his attempts to have Mexico pay for the wall, as he had promised, nor has he been able to secure $18 billion for the project from Congress, which would pay for 300 miles of new barriers and the replacement of 400 miles of existing fencing, according to The Post. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, center_img President Trump to visit San Diego next week KUSI Newsroom Updated: 2:34 PMlast_img read more

September 14, 2019
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People on the Move 081910

first_imgRichard David Story has been named a senior vice president of American Express Publishing. Story will continue to serve as editor-in-chief of Departures.American Express Publishing also named Frederica Wald director of custom solutions. Prior to serving as a consultant to American ExpressPublishing in 2009, Wald spent 14 years at Time Inc. where sheco-founded and launched Time Inc.’s Custom Publishing division.Lucky magazine named Annie Taube executive director of creative services. Most recently, Taube served as fashion and accessories director at Vogue. Ziff Davis Enterprise named Elliot Markoxitz vice president of content development, in charge of redesigning and amplifying the company’s editorial digital events portfolio. Markowitz most recently served as director of programming at virtual events vendor INXPO. Before that, he served as editorial director of Nielsen Business Media’s Web Seminars and Digital Events.Meredith Corp promoted Tony Platt to chief creative officer for the CRM and Custom Publishing practice at Meredith Integrated Marketing. Melina Gerosa Bellows, currently executive vice president of Children’s Publishing, assumed the expanded role of chief creative officer for National Geographic Kids and Family.Time Inc.’s Fortune magazine named Dan Primack as a senior editor of Fortune.com. Primack comes from Thomson Reuters, where he launched the peHUB Wire daily e-mail newsletter.Good Housekeeping made a pair of personnel changes: Glamour features director Veronica Chambers was appointed to the newly-created position of deputy editor, responsible for management of brand extensions; and Nina Judar was named beauty director.Helicopter maintenance magazine HeliMx named R. Fred Polak editor. Polak has written technical manuals and served as a teacher since retiring from Honeywell Aerospace.last_img read more

September 10, 2019
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The Big Bang Theory ends but Dr Amy Farrah Fowler lives on

first_img Tags 50 Photos Comments Share your voice 2019 TV shows you can’t misscenter_img 6 Mayim Bialik is a neuroscientist in real life. Presley Ann In a season of long-running shows bringing their stories to a (mostly satisfying) end, The Big Bang Theory did just that: wrap up the adventures of very smart people who live in a shared apartment and spend their free time playing Settlers of Catan.Along with physicists Sheldon and Leonard, we also said goodbye to a character who joined in season 3 and soon moved in to the Big Bang building permanently.Bespectacled neurobiologist Dr. Amy Farrah Fowler, alumni of Harvard and, spoiler, wife of Sheldon, represents the world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Dr. Amy joins the ranks of female TV characters working in STEM, alongside Cosima in Orphan Black, Dr. Temperance Brennan in Bones and Mindy Lahiri from The Mindy Project, to name a few.Played by Mayim Bialik (of Blossom fame), Dr. Amy made her entrance as a love interest to socially inept child prodigy Sheldon Cooper, wooing him with lines like, “All forms of physical contact, up to and including coitus, are off the table.” A true TV love story rivaling Jon Snow and Ygritte soon blossomed, though with less death and more intellectual discussion.Adept at both comedy and being really smart, Bialik is a neuroscientist in real life, having completed her Ph.D. at UCLA in 2007. Bialik has written four books, one of which, Girling Up, focuses on the many struggles girls face on their way to adulthood.The Big Bang Theory may have ended after 12 seasons on CBS (disclosure: CBS is CNET’s parent company) but Bialik continues to pave the way for budding female scientists. Speaking to CNET, she touched on women working in STEM and the reasons behind their low representation. “There’s a certain amount of hand wringing that I do about it, but part of it is also understanding that there’s a shift in the way we see women at all in any profession,” Bialik says.foto4.jpgA love story for the ages. CBS Photo Archive Women historically haven’t pursued these kinds of careers, Bialik says, noting that the industrial revolution brought in the first shift of female involvement in sciences in recent history, with World War II seeing women participating in different ways.”It was not so long ago that women were not even encouraged to work outside of the home,” Bialik says.A recent study on STEM looked into the number of women who earned degrees in those subjects. The study, from the National Center for Education Statistics, covered an eight-year period, starting in 2008, and found that the number of female students who’d been granted a STEM degree or certificate had increased by 48 percent over that period.Despite the progress, embarking on a STEM career for a woman isn’t necessarily an easy decision, Bialik stresses. “As a woman, the decisions you make about when to have children is going to largely be determined by what kind of career you have and how the government has established you to have support while you’re in your child-bearing years,” Bialik says.The work itself may not always be appealing either.”Girls and boys do tend to for the most part want to think and learn differently,” Bialik says. “The notion of being a lone scientist in a laboratory does not appeal to most girls.”But the notion of being in the field, working with other people, working with animals, those are things that girls find more interesting.”Some of women’s hesitation to take on STEM careers can be traced to the classroom when they’re growing up.”We have to remember there are social dynamics that are going to work on boys and girls in the classroom that exist elsewhere in society,” Bialik says.On whether she was afraid of putting her hand up in the classroom to answer a question, she says: “A lot of the boys are raised to be very confident, our culture emphasizes that, and for me, there was a lot of social pressure.”I felt very embarrassed if I got something wrong.”The issue may change, it’ll just take time.”So again, I think a lot of that is what our culture is like in the patriarchy, and it’s something that is absolutely shifting and will continue to shift,” Bialik says.”But … that’s not something that’s going to happen overnight.”Looking ahead, Bialik advocates girls meeting and having mentor opportunities with women working in the sciences to hear firsthand about the choices those women made, why they made them, and to show that STEM careers can be creative, exciting and dynamic.”It’s not just sitting alone in a laboratory,” Bialik says. TV and Movieslast_img read more

September 2, 2019
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Construction Moves Further South On The Gulf Freeway

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen 00:00 /01:16 Share X – / 7That project will increase the number of lanes on the Gulf Freeway from six to ten. TxDOT has already completed widening between Beltway 8 and NASA Road One. Now that project is going further south, to FM 517 near Dickinson.   On a ramp high above the freeway officials gave an update on the work. Texas Transportation Commissioner Laura Ryan says with all the growth in in the region, the number of vehicles on the Gulf Freeway could increase by 70% in the coming decades.“This initiative allows us the opportunity to address the mobility gap and seamlessly connect corridors and projects,” says Ryan. “To deliver a corridor and not just individual projects and segmented projects.”But while that construction is in progress, what does that mean for people just trying to get to the beach?  We asked TxDOT District Engineer Quincy Allen. “We’re trying to keep the same number of freeway lanes open at all times,” explains Allen. “We had three lanes before we started. We’ll try to keep three lanes at all times.” The section between NASA Road One and and FM 518 should be finished in late 2021. The segment between League City and Dickinson is expected to wrap up by December 2020. The work will cost about $220 million.last_img read more