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January 20, 2020
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Swans take flight at Charitable Golf tourney

first_img “Our brother school, Kingston College (KC), we thank them for their support and all who came on board to assist us in our first staging of this event,” Davis told The Gleaner. Some of today’s main event sponsors include Guardian Group, Campari/Wray and Nephew, Toyota Jamaica, Supreme Ventures, VMBS, Scotiabank, Jamaica National, KC Old Boys-Association, Singer, Bert’s Auto Parts, Guardsman Alarm, Central Medical, Thwaites Finson and Sharp Insurance, Bio Medical, Tropical Blue, Mayberry Investments, plus Swans (past students) Roxanne and husband Michael Morris; and Loray Blair from Florida, United States. GRATEFUL FOR SUPPORT Sandra Davis, a “proud” St Hugh’s past student fondly known as ‘Swans’, is inviting golfers, golfing enthusiasts and charitable Jamaicans to support today’s teeing off of the Swans Charitable Golf Tournament at the Constant Spring Golf Club in St Andrew. The event tees off at 7 a.m. and continues to 2 p.m., with an entry fee of $4,000, which includes cocktails. Competition will take on the 18-hole stableford format (scoring points based on the number of strokes taken at each hole), with full handicap. Categories include men, men’s seniors, men’s super seniors, ladies, juniors, as well as boys and girls aged 11-17. The successful participants will be given prizes in a cocktail and awards ceremony beginning at 6:30 p.m. The tournament director will be David Mais. According to Davis, public relations officer, the event is being staged by the St Hugh’s Past Students Association to raise funds towards the renovation of the St Hugh’s High School Care Centre and Outreach programmes and to assist young ladies on welfare. “We are looking to target 80-100 golfers, and we have been getting tremendous help through the Constant Spring Golf Club,” she said. “We are inviting our Swans to come and support us, and for those who don’t play golf, there will be a fashion show put on by a Swan where swimwear, casual wear, and other clothes will be modelled,” added Davis. She stressed that Markland ‘Action’ Edwards and ‘DJ Delly’ from RJR would be entertaining from 1 to 4 p.m.last_img read more

November 18, 2019
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Let The March Madness Begin!

first_imgThursday marks something of a national holiday for American sports fans, when office productivity plummets. The NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship, better known as March Madness or the Big Dance, begins in earnest.A few play-in games have already happened, but Thursday and Friday feature the real opening extravaganza: 16 games each day, from noon to midnight.The single-elimination tournament means every game is a must-win for all 68 schools, producing tense, dramatic finishes. Upsets are eagerly anticipated as elites like Kentucky fend off unknowns trying to spark an improbable run and become the next tournament darling, like last year’s Dayton.Fanatics, novices and even President Barack Obama are trying to predict the winners of every game of every round by completing an estimated 70 million tournament brackets, according to the American Gaming Association — that’s more brackets completed than votes cast in the last presidential election. Here’s a brief explanation of how a basketball tournament transcended sports to become a national craze:MADNESS FROM THE STARTCollege basketball has long filled the gap in the American sports calendar when baseball and football are dormant. In 1939, Oregon beat Ohio State in the inaugural eight-team tournament.It seems modest now, but it was a risky venture: a year earlier the rival National Invitational Tournament had begun at New York’s old Madison Square Garden, already the most famous venue in basketball.The two tournaments competed for years, before the NCAA, as college sports’ governing body, managed to force member schools to participate in its tournament if they were invited (the NIT still exists as a consolation tournament).The NCAA field kept growing as TV coverage spurred interest, so more spots were given to smaller schools. The potential for a David to slay a Goliath set the stage for what remains the most-watched basketball game ever: the 1979 final pitting little-known Indiana State, led by Larry Bird, against powerhouse Michigan State, led by Magic Johnson.A quarter of U.S. homes tuned in for the classic game that transformed Bird and Johnson into rival superstars and catapulted college basketball into the American consciousness.THE BIG DANCE GETS BIGGERThe fledgling ESPN cable network began broadcasting the tournament’s oft-ignored early rounds in 1980, giving national exposure to lesser-known schools. CBS popularized the term “March Madness” through the 1980s as unlikely champions like North Carolina State and Villanova captivated Americans.TV ratings skyrocketed, and so did revenue for the NCAA. In 2013, according to the latest figures available from Kantar Media, TV advertising revenue was a staggering $1.15 billion, more than even the NFL playoffs and Super Bowl (though pro football, by far the most popular American sport, has far fewer postseason games).This year, 68 schools play in 14 venues across the U.S. Every game will be on TV and streaming online. The champion must win six games as the field winnows, from the Sweet 16 to the Elite Eight to the Final Four. The semifinals and championship will be played April 4-6 in a football stadium in Indianapolis.AN AMERICAN OBSESSION: BRACKETS! UPSETS!Fans competing in online bracket pools — often for money, though that’s technically illegal — have up until the moment the first game tips shortly after noon Eastern (0400 GMT) Thursday.Brackets will be busted by unpredictable upsets, like tiny Mercer’s dethroning of Duke last year. One of the most famous upsets was achieved in 2001 by Hampton.Who does Kentucky, this tournament’s overwhelming favorite, play in its first game? Hampton. That game just happens to be scheduled for prime-time on March 20. Kentucky is favored to win by 32 points, according to oddsmakers. But in March, anything is possible.(RICK FREEMAN, AP Sports Writer)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

October 24, 2019
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Commendations for Parent Mentorship Programme

first_img Director of Parenting Support, Coordination and Behavioural Change at NPSC, Peta Gay Waugh, says that the partnership with CSJP is very important to the service that the agency provides. Story Highlights Resident of Maverly in Kingston, Kathleen Thomas Douse, has high praises for the National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC) Parent Mentorship Programme. Nicole Ramsay, a single mother of five from the Fletcher’s Land community in Kingston, lauds the programme. The standout element of the programme for her was the self-reflection exercise. Resident of Maverly in Kingston, Kathleen Thomas Douse, has high praises for the National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC) Parent Mentorship Programme.“I was not such a good parent, but being involved in the Parent Mentorship Programme has helped me a lot,” Mrs. Thomas Douse tells JIS News.Mrs. Thomas Douse, who is President of the Maverly Community parenting group, was introduced to the programme by the Citizen Security and Justice Programme (CSJP), which sponsored her training.Before the programme, she says she used to hit her children whenever they misbehaved. However, she found that her method yielded no result. Now she has changed her method to that of communication.“I believed in spanking my children. Every second letter from my mouth came with a slap. Now I tell parents that slapping does not work,” she tells JIS News.“Now I find myself having monthly meetings with my children and we decide and make steps as family. Whatever occurs in the family, we talk about it instead of beat about it,” adds Mrs. Thomas Douse.Another parent, Nicole Ramsay, a single mother of five from the Fletcher’s Land community in Kingston, also lauds the programme.The standout element of the programme for her was the self-reflection exercise.“It gives you a chance to look back at life and to see where you are coming from and to address what is not up to standard,” she says.Like Mrs. Thomas Douse, she also regrets the type of parent she was before the CSJP introduced her to the Parent Mentorship Programme.“Before I did the training, I was not the effective parent that I was supposed to be. Now my children and I have conversations that are non-violent and they now look at me as a different mother and we respect each other,” shares Ms. Ramsay.In addition to discussing issues with her children, Ms. Ramsay says that she has found that being honest and open with them is also quite effective.“You have to be honest with your children and expect honesty. Grow your children in such a way that if they do something wrong they can come to you and say ‘Mommy, I know it was wrong, but this is what I did’,” she reasons.Both parents now work with other parents in their communities to help them to be positive influences in the lives of their children and other youth.They and hundreds of other parents across the country are now better able to handle disputes within their homes and mend relationships with their children, thanks to the Parent Mentorship Programme.Recently in partnership with the CSJP, over 400 residents in Rocky Point, Clarendon, benefitted from the NPSC’s ‘From Street Talk to Real Talk’, a community- based outreach activity that culminated the Parent Mentorship Programme, which is a 13- week programme before parents are deployed to communities and schools.Home visits are conducted and psychosocial support offered, mentoring, family mediation, family mentoring, parenting education and on-the-spot training are some of the services provided on the day.‘From Street Talk to Real Talk’ has been reaching out to parents from across several communities since May 2015.Social Worker attached to the CSJP, Kenneth Barnes, tells JIS News that the event in Clarendon was well received by residents as they were able to assist a number of community members and mentor trainees got an opportunity to put in practice their training.“We were able to assist parents in terms of external referrals [and] the trainees did well in terms of their approach in building initial rapport with the parents that they met with and also how they handled the dialogue,” he says.Director of Parenting Support, Coordination and Behavioural Change at NPSC, Peta Gay Waugh, says that the partnership with CSJP is very important to the service that the agency provides.“CSJP and NPSC have been working very closely from 2013. It is important for sustainability for the partnership to be as it is as well as to ensure that the communities we serve do not see any gaps in service delivery,” she says.In addition to the CSJP, support is also provided by other State agencies, including the Centre for the Investigation of Sexual Offences and Child Abuse, Office of the Children’s Registry, Child Development Agency, psychologists and social workers.Ms. Waugh says that by 2019, it is hoped that 400 parent mentors will be trained to cover all parishes in Jamaica.“If the community buys into the elements and principles of effective parenting, then we will certainly see a behavioural change in how the community operates value system wise as well as a behavioural change in how our children behave at the school, home and community levels,” she says.The NPSC is an agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information.The CSJP supports this and similar interventions through funding from the Inter-American Development Bank, United Kingdom Department for International Development and Global Affairs Canada.last_img read more