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September 16, 2020
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Women’s soccer upsets No. 8 North Carolina

first_imgThe Trojans took down No. 8 North Carolina in a dominant 3-0 victory on Sunday, setting an aggressive tone on offense from the first whistle.The team’s first shot came from redshirt junior Alex Anthony within the first minute of the game, and the pace didn’t slow from there. The team’s first goal came in the fifth minute, with senior Kayla Mills sending in a perfect arc on a corner kick for senior Morgan Andrews to bury in the back of the net.“We wanted to show them that we can fly on offense,” Anthony said. “Coming in, we wanted to prove that we can compete; we can set the pace of the game and really control it, and that’s what we did from the beginning.”That pace paid off again in the 29th minute, when junior Katie Johnson took a cross off her chest and smashed a shot into the left side of the netting. The Trojans had been controlling possession for most of the game, but the 2-0 lead made it clear that they were in control.Opportunities for the Tar Heels to counter only came in spurts in the first half, which was mostly spent in the Trojans’ attacking half of the field. The team kept North Carolina on its heels, flattening and spreading the defense to make any type of counterattack difficult to execute.“We’re an attacking team, and we wanted to come out here and prove that today,” head coach Keidane McAlpine said. “No matter what team we’re playing, this is the confidence and the energy we want to bring to the field.”But despite the success of the first half, the real challenge was maintaining that pressure for a full 90 minutes. The second half was much more balanced for both teams, with the Tar Heels spending more time in the USC goal box, and reshirt senior goalie Sammy Jo Prudhomme wrapping up a few more saves.But the Trojans didn’t back down throughout the half, continuing to pressure and force opportunities in the box. Anthony punctuated that pace by slamming home a shot from several feet outside the goal box in the 65th minute, marking the first time in five years that North Carolina allowed three goals in a game. The frontline continued to attack until the final whistle blew, giving the team one of their biggest victories of the year.There are few teams in women’s soccer with as dominant and storied of a history as North Carolina. With 22 national championships since the tournament began in 1982, the Tar Heels have produced dozens of Olympic champions over the last four decades, including Mia Hamm and Heather O’Reilly. Year in and year out, the team is expected to provide some of the heaviest competition in the NCAA.The enormity of the victory and the dominance with which the team played was not lost on Anthony or her players.“This is a high-caliber team, and anyone who plays them knows that,” Anthony said. “I think what we did today, not only with getting the win, but in how we played, how we attacked. I think that’s really going to do a lot for our confidence and the way we play together as a team moving forward.”The victory is also the fifth straight shutout for the backline. The defense only defended 10 shots and three corner kicks throughout the game, with Prudhomme only needing to wrap up four saves.Though it was a dominant win for the team, the match wasn’t without its frustrations. The Trojans missed two penalty kicks, with one blocked and the other waved off when sophomore Leah Pruitt tried to knock in her own rebounded shot. But McAlpine believed that the cohesive style of play that his team maintained for the full game was one of the best performances he has seen this season.“Today was fantastic,” McAlpine said. “I think the team decided as a whole they weren’t the biggest fans of losing those first two games. We came out here today and played our game. That’s right where we want to be, for this game and for every game this season.”last_img read more

August 12, 2020
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Spectacular scoring creates a three-way tie

first_img Spectacular scoring has created a three-way tie on nine-under par at the halfway stage of the European Amateur Championship at Walton Heath, Surrey. Spain’s Victor Pastor staked the first claim to the lead when he came in with his eight-under 64, moving him up 47 places. He was joined by Switzerland’s Jeremy Freiberghaus, who scored 66, and Australia’s Dylan Perry, who added 69 to his opening 66. Tucked right in behind them on eight-under are England’s Matthew Jordan and German’s Matthias Schmid, who was the day’s big mover, rocketing up 72 places with his nine-under 63, the low round of the championship so far. They’re part of a very crowded leaderboard with over 30 players within five shots of the lead, creating a highly competitive atmosphere. “It’s always good to see a lot of bunched players,” said Perry. “Everyone is playing well and you’ve just got to keep doing the right things and put the scores on the board.” He built on his first round with the benefit of an increasingly hot putter which provided him with three birdies and an eagle on his back nine. “All in all I’m very pleased with where I am, heading into the third round,” added Perry, who was runner-up in last weekend’s Amateur Championship. Great putting was a common theme among the day’s best players. Pastor, 22, was one-under in the first round and commented: “I played the same on both days but I missed some putts yesterday. Today I holed five or six putts of five or six metres.” Meanwhile Freiberghaus had seven birdies in a spell of nine holes, starting his run on the fourth, where he almost holed his second shot. The momentum faded after the 12th and he was unable to capitalise on the closing par fives, but he was undismayed: “It was a little bit frustrating but it shows me I can make some improvement.” By contrast Matthew Jordan’s round took off on the 12th when he holed a 57-yard pitch for an eagle two and he followed up with birdies on the three par fives which make the back nine so score-able. “When that shot went in it was a massive bonus and I really tried to capitalise,” he remarked. Jordan (Royal Liverpool, Cheshire), who recently won the St Andrews Links Trophy, is another player who is only too well aware of the need to bear down. “This is a very good standard of competition and you have to go out there and try and shoot a score. You can’t slow down!” He shares fourth place with Matthias Schmid (pictured bottom)  whose nine-under 63 was a personal best and also improved on his first day score by 10 shots. The difference was the putting, which helped him amass seven birdies and two eagles, on the eighth, where holed a 20-footer and on the 16th, where he left himself an 18 inch putt.  “I felt very calm, I just made hole after hole, shot after shot,” he said. “My putter was unbelievable and I rolled a few long ones in.” But he also confessed: “I did have on three-putt on the 15th – it was a bit of a shocker!” The nine players on seven-under include defending champion Luca Cianchetti of Italy who was round in 67 today; and England’s Josh McMahon (Wallasey, Cheshire) who matched his score with a bogey-free card. There’s more English interest in the group on six under. Alfie Plant (Sundridge Park, Kent) set off in style with a birdie on the first and went to sign for 66. “I’ve been playing well for the last few weeks and it’s just been a matter of time before the putts started dropping,” he said. Daniel O’Loughlin (Ruddington Park, Nottinghamshire) birdied three of the last five holes to add 71 to his opening 67. First round leader Lorenzo Scalise of Italy slipped back to five-under par and a share of 19th place after returning a second round 75. After tomorrow’s third round the field will be cut to the leading 60 players and ties who will play the final round on Saturday. Click here for full scores Images copyright Leaderboard Photography 29 Jun 2017 Spectacular scoring creates a three-way tie last_img read more

August 12, 2020
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NHL has best names in the business. Nicknames, that is

first_imgIn this June 3, 2013, file photo, Pittsburgh Penguins’ Sidney Crosby (87) prepares for a face off during the second period of Game 2 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Eastern Conference finals against the Boston Bruins in Pittsburgh. The NHL has the best names in the business. Nicknames, that is. Little Ball of Hate. The Great One. Tazer. Bicksy. Crosby is known as the “Sid the Kid.” (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File) by Nancy Armour CHICAGO (AP) — The best names in the NHL are the ones that never make the roster.Or get used by Mom.Tazer. Little Ball of Hate. The Great One. Sid the Kid. Looch (who also goes by Gino). The Bulin Wall. Kells.“There’s always someone, or a few guys, that want to call you different things,” said Chicago Blackhawks left wing Brandon Saad, dubbed “The ManChild” by his teammates. “I guess it’s just part of the camaraderie of the sport and the guys being close. I’m not really sure of the exact science.” Anyone who has ever played a sport knows that nicknames are part of the game, a byproduct of both competition and camaraderie. But hockey players have taken it to an art form.From the littlest mite to the NHL’s biggest stars, everyone’s got a moniker — and usually more than one. Most are simplistic, involving the addition or subtraction of a letter or two. Shorten a last name, tack on an ‘s’ or a ‘y’ (‘ie’ also works) and, voila! Instant nickname. Patrice Bergeron becomes “Bergy.” Brent Seabrook is “Seabs” or “Seabsy.”If a player’s last name only has one syllable, just add an ‘r’ or a ‘y’ (the ‘ie’ rule applies here, as well). Patrick Kane is now forever known as “Kaner,” while Patrick Sharp, his occasional partner on Chicago’s second line, is “Sharpie.”And anyone whose last name is Campbell is automatically “Soup” or “Soupy.”“Pretty boring,” said Boston Bruins center Chris Kelly, who is known as, you guessed it, “Kells.” ”I wish we came up with cooler nicknames.”But the beauty of the simplicity is in its versatility. It can be applied to almost any name, regardless of nationality.Jaromir Jagr? Jags. Alex Ovechkin? Ovie. Marty Turco? Turks.It even works with Bruins left wing Kaspars Daugavins “We call him Doggie,” Kelly said.But just as there are exceptions to every grammatical rule, there are some names that defy the conventions of hockey nicknamification. Or lend themselves to some added creativity.Blackhawks right wing Jamal Mayers is “Jammer” — not to be confused with Chicago defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson, who is “Hammer.” Edmonton goalie Nikolai Khabibulin is “The Bulin Wall.” Henrik Lundqvist, he of the 2012 Vezina Trophy, seven straight 30-win seasons and Olympic gold medal in 2006, is, simply, King Henrik.last_img read more